Death Of The 60’s…

… or at least the Woodstock-Utopian vision of the 1960’s.

 I hope Neil Young will remember,
Southern man don’t need him around, anyhow.

Of course, while it is true that music can’t save the world – science and ‘spirituality’ can.  There is no fool like an old fool. 

 al sends

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4 responses to “Death Of The 60’s…

  1. Wow. What a revelation to the world of self-absorbed but socially-conscious musicians. Makes me wonder if this is a result of Neil’s advancing age leading to increased wisdom, or just increased pessimism. I’m thinking the latter.

    “It’s better to burn out, than to fade away… My, My, Hey, Hey…”

  2. Music can change the world. Music is a tool (an instrument, if you will) of war and worship. Music is spiritual. So, music can change the world. In fact, it has, although not necessarily for the better. If we waste our time on silly music, or music that has the significance of a twinkie, we make the world weak and malnourished. If our songs are serious and rightly sung, their impact is profound and powerful.

    It isn’t the power of music, it is the weakness of the musicians that is failing the world. Why did we give the world of music to Madonna and Michael Jackson and Fifty Cent and Van Halen?

    Of course, it is all spiritual. Let him who has ears to hear tap his toe.

  3. I think Neil Young’s point was that music cant SAVE the world. When he says change he means save. The 2nd to last paragraph he makes that clear.

    Good points about worship (the hight of which is music/singing according to Jim Jordan) worship changes the world. The object of that worship directs the change.

    al sends

  4. I say let 60s drug-induced optimism die a quick and painful death. And then stomp on it and kick it to make sure it’s really dead. The only optimism is gospel optimism. Rob is right and Neil Young smoked or poked one too many. At least now he’s sober and thinking a litter straighter it seems.

    On a related note, one of the best books about the 60s I ever read was the biography of David Horowitz called Radical Son. What a weird, wild journey. From Black Panthers to Reagan conservative. Go figure.

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